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Doctor Who Ends the Season With a Bang! July 25, 2010

Posted by rainegendron in Doctor Who, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Television, Television.
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Following from the cliffhanger of the previous episode The Pandorica Opens we encounter The Big Bang part Duex, to me more correct.

As with any Doctor Who episode you have to pay close attention to the details. In The Big Bang this is ever so much more the case. The story unfolds a complete reboot of our entire reality because the exploding TARDIS effectively collapsed all history, and all existence, at all points in time and space. This unlikely premise seems crazy, but is explained, provided you pay attention and think. But don’t think too hard, because the story, like the entire season preceding it, is writer Moffat’s version of a fairy tale and plays on the innate importance of imagination, memory and myth.

A TARDIS Sun

There is a lot of time jumping, and alternate timelines, which makes one, question the many paradoxes of time travel. Can you really meet your future or past self? Perhaps only in the mythology of the Whoverse is that possible.

And so our characters are now living in the reality of the Universe created by Big Bang Two, which is very like the Universe of Big Bang One. What this means exactly is anyone’s guess. It’s hard to say what the ramifications of the second Big Bang will be. It could be used as a way to undo some things from the RTD era or to bring back characters we thought were dead.

Too much paradox?

I don’t want to give away the biggest spoiler, but to say that as far as Doctor Who season finales go, this one was highly unusual in that it left many unanswered questions for next season. The only question it didn’t ask was a question of cast, as it looks like all the principles will be returning, and (yeah!) we now have our first married companion couple onboard the TARDIS and traveling with the Doctor. Until now, the TARDIS has been a sex-free zone. How will Amy and Rory deal with that aspect of married life? Moreover how will the BBC deal with it?

My biggest rave has to be Matt Smith this season. There have been some wobbles, but by ‘Pandorica’ and ‘Big Bang’ he has proven to inhabit the Doctor and meet all challenges and naysayers in taking over the role from fan favorite David Tennant.

Best Quote:
“I’ve got questions, but number one is this: What in the name of sanity have you got on your head?” —River Song, just prior to yanking off the Doctor’s fez and shooting it.
A fez dies a glorious death

Best Parts:
The moments when the Doctor is tucking in little Amelia and telling his ‘story’ was supurb. “A daft old man who stole (well borrowed) a magic box.” I was riveted to Smith there. He really was great at showing all of the Doctor’s long years, and his obvious love of the TARDIS. “Big and little at the same time. Brand new and ancient. And the bluest blue ever.”

A daft old man who stole a magic box

How can you not love little Amelia Pond? [Caitlin Blackwood and also an actual relation to Karen Gillan]

Worst Parts: Some things really did make no sense. It was Big on the whimsy and sentiment, but shoddy on the science. Then again, we are talking about what is essentially a fairy tale.

My Rating: A very good end to a good (if unusual) season. I just had hoped for a little bit more. Sonic-Four.







A Gothic Vampire Honeymoon May 22, 2010

Posted by rainegendron in Doctor Who, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Television, Television, Vampires.
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Vampires of Venice. I really enjoyed this episode!

First of all, this episode looked absolutely gorgeous! The 16th Century Venice (actually Croatia) settings, locations, and costumes were all just stunning and looked more big budget than they probably were. In fact, I think this was one of the best-looking NuWho’s I can remember over the past several seasons.

It was a good story and if not exactly a pure historical episode, it felt historical. As overdone as they are, Vampires continually make good scary/creepy story material and the twist of them being alien was cool, but not entirely unexpected. I was not expecting fish-aliens though (I wonder if they are related to the Hath?). Helen McCrory was excellent as Rosanna, Queen Mother of the Saturnynian, and I actually found myself feeling just a little bit sorry for her in the end. Really, she was just trying to help her species survive (WHY won’t these people ever listen to the Doctor when he is willing to give them a chance!). Rosanna’s face-off with the Doctor was extremely interesting to watch and showed that Matt Smith is proving more than capable in the role of the Doctor. Smith’s Doctor is proving to be a man who is a little more easily unnerved than previous Doctors. Then again, it could just be because he knows of the impending Cracks as he remembers Rosanna’s words, “We saw silence, and the end of all things…”

I’m loving the addition of Amy’s fiancé Rory (Arthur Darvill) to the TARDIS and I hope he proves to be a valued companion and not just another half-companion the way Mickey sometimes was. The Doctor seems pretty clear on not having any romantic entanglements with Amy, which is a good thing, and I’d like to see Amy and Rory become more like the Barbra/Ian dynamic of old.

Best Parts: Lots of funny moments!

The Doctor popping out of a cake at the stag party—more than once!
Dig the old library card with the first Doctor’s (Hartnell) photo on it!
Love the Steampunk-inspired goggles and the new TARDIS set.

A good twist on the Vampires, which is saying something considering how oversaturated that subject matter currently is.

Worst Parts: Yet another ending that involves the Doctor climbing a tower or spire to dismantle some alien piece of gadgetry that will advert disaster and save the day. We tend to see this ending quite a lot in Doctor Who and it should really be more original.

My Rating: Quite nice, I give it a 3-1/2 out 5.





Find The Crack. A Message to the Doctor? May 7, 2010

Posted by rainegendron in Doctor Who, Fringe, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Television, Television.
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Are the writers of FRINGE sending a message to Moffat over the pond at Doctor Who?

Last night brought us yet another excellent episode of FRINGE. The episode, entitled Northwest Passage, was noticeable in that Peter (Joshua Jackson) flies solo this time in an adventure of his own. Peter is running away from his own self perhaps after realizing he was actually taken from the alternate universe as a boy [S216 “Peter” and S219 “The Man from the Other Side”]. While traveling and getting some alone time, Peter becomes embroiled in a murder case in Noyo County; and he’s seen these murders before at the hands of the people from the Other Parallel Earth. During the investigation, Peter goes from chief suspect to chief investigator, helping the local law enforcement catch a killer. Small-town Sheriff Mathis has a fancy pen with an engraved motto that reads “Find The Crack” a gift from her partner who believed in her. After the investigation wraps up, she passes the pen (and some wisdom) along to Peter with the hope he will find his place in the world as well.

Maybe I’m just a bit too much of a geek, or maybe I’ve just been watching too much sci-fi television lately, but the pointed message FIND THE CRACK seems just a little too coincidental given what has been going on over in the Whoverse. Is there a little wink wink, nod nod going on to Doctor Who? Either way, I’m loving it! FRINGE is much improved over its first season, and the last several episodes since the mid-season break have been excellent examples of science fiction writing and terrific acting from the cast, most especially from John Noble (Walter). Heck, they even got through a period-themed fairy tale story singalong last week. Whatever is happening over there in the Fringe offices (Brown Betty perhaps?) keep up the good work!