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Doctor Who Ends the Season With a Bang! July 25, 2010

Posted by rainegendron in Doctor Who, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Television, Television.
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Following from the cliffhanger of the previous episode The Pandorica Opens we encounter The Big Bang part Duex, to me more correct.

As with any Doctor Who episode you have to pay close attention to the details. In The Big Bang this is ever so much more the case. The story unfolds a complete reboot of our entire reality because the exploding TARDIS effectively collapsed all history, and all existence, at all points in time and space. This unlikely premise seems crazy, but is explained, provided you pay attention and think. But don’t think too hard, because the story, like the entire season preceding it, is writer Moffat’s version of a fairy tale and plays on the innate importance of imagination, memory and myth.

A TARDIS Sun

There is a lot of time jumping, and alternate timelines, which makes one, question the many paradoxes of time travel. Can you really meet your future or past self? Perhaps only in the mythology of the Whoverse is that possible.

And so our characters are now living in the reality of the Universe created by Big Bang Two, which is very like the Universe of Big Bang One. What this means exactly is anyone’s guess. It’s hard to say what the ramifications of the second Big Bang will be. It could be used as a way to undo some things from the RTD era or to bring back characters we thought were dead.

Too much paradox?

I don’t want to give away the biggest spoiler, but to say that as far as Doctor Who season finales go, this one was highly unusual in that it left many unanswered questions for next season. The only question it didn’t ask was a question of cast, as it looks like all the principles will be returning, and (yeah!) we now have our first married companion couple onboard the TARDIS and traveling with the Doctor. Until now, the TARDIS has been a sex-free zone. How will Amy and Rory deal with that aspect of married life? Moreover how will the BBC deal with it?

My biggest rave has to be Matt Smith this season. There have been some wobbles, but by ‘Pandorica’ and ‘Big Bang’ he has proven to inhabit the Doctor and meet all challenges and naysayers in taking over the role from fan favorite David Tennant.

Best Quote:
“I’ve got questions, but number one is this: What in the name of sanity have you got on your head?” —River Song, just prior to yanking off the Doctor’s fez and shooting it.
A fez dies a glorious death

Best Parts:
The moments when the Doctor is tucking in little Amelia and telling his ‘story’ was supurb. “A daft old man who stole (well borrowed) a magic box.” I was riveted to Smith there. He really was great at showing all of the Doctor’s long years, and his obvious love of the TARDIS. “Big and little at the same time. Brand new and ancient. And the bluest blue ever.”

A daft old man who stole a magic box

How can you not love little Amelia Pond? [Caitlin Blackwood and also an actual relation to Karen Gillan]

Worst Parts: Some things really did make no sense. It was Big on the whimsy and sentiment, but shoddy on the science. Then again, we are talking about what is essentially a fairy tale.

My Rating: A very good end to a good (if unusual) season. I just had hoped for a little bit more. Sonic-Four.







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Cold Blood Left Me Rather Cold June 21, 2010

Posted by rainegendron in Doctor Who, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Television, Television.
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I was hoping the second half of this week’s Doctor Who episode would exceed the first part entitled “The Hungry Earth,” as the back half of two-part stories usually do. However, with the exception of the last ten minutes I was left almost as cold blooded as the Silurians and felt that much of the episode dragged on.

The shape of things to come?

Despite this, the episode did have some good points. I give kudos to the fine supporting cast in this story. The performances of Nasreen (Meera Syal), Tony Mac (Robert Pugh), Ambrose (Nia Roberts), and their reptilian counterparts Alaya/Restac (Neve McIntosh), Malohikeh (Richard Hope), and Eldane (Stephen Moore) were all top notch and managed to transcend the oftentimes-general silliness of the plot.

The idea of us humans having to share the planet with the original Silurian inhabitants should have provided a little more drama that what it eventually did and I was a little disappointed at the outcome. This idea should have provided more tension, and the whole negotiation table scene could have been truncated. We all knew they wouldn’t come to an agreement on how to share Earth now didn’t we? Humans can’t even manage to share a country or silly strip of land without wars, let alone a whole planet! It is an interesting idea that the Silurians will wake up in 3010 along with Nasreen and Tony Mac… but that’s a tale for another time.

Nasreen and Tony Mac prepare for life underground.

Oh my God, they killed Rory. You bastards!

The best part of the story came in the last few minutes with the death of Rory (Arthur Darvill) and the reappearance of the Crack. I’ve liked the addition of Rory as companion and hate that he bought it here at the hands of the Silurian She-Devil Restac. I’m hoping that it won’t be the end of Rory since Time can be unwritten/rewritten. It wouldn’t be the first time a companion “died” only to be brought back somehow. Remember that Rose supposedly died, as did Donna, but really other things happened. Whatever the outcome proves to be with Rory and the broken-up TARDIS, it was some nice work there with Matt, Karen, and Arthur at the end of this episode. Poor Rory.

Elegy for Rory.

Best Parts: The Death of Rory
Worst Parts: The Death of Rory

My Rating: First 35 minutes = 2. Last 10 minutes = 5. I guess that averages a 3.

I know I’m not supposed to break it up this way, but that how I roll.